Preserved Pears

While this is not a seasonal recipe, it sounds like it would be delicious.

For to make wardens in Conserue.
Fyrste make the syrope in this wyse, take a quarte of good romney and putte a pynte of claryfyed honey, and a pounde or a halfe of suger, and myngle all those together over the fyre, till tyme they seeth, and then set it to cole. And thys is a good sirope for manye thinges, and wyll be kepte a yere or two. Then take thy warden and scrape cleane awaye the barke, but pare them not, and seeth them in good redde wyne so that they be wel soked and tender, that the wyne be nere hande soked into them, then take and strayne them throughe a cloth or through a strayner into a vessell, then put to them of this syrope aforesayde tyll it be almost fylled, and then caste in the pouders, as fyne canel, synamon, pouder of gynger and such other, and put it in a boxes and kepe it yf thou wylt and make thy syrope as thou wylt worke in quantyte, as if thou wylt worke twenty wardens or more or lesse as by experience.

This is a Tudor recipe from A Proper Newe Booke of Cookery published in 1545. The warden is a type of pear, preserved in honey and sugar with spices it must have been versatile and apparently it kept well. I have been on a fruit and ice cream kick, this word be fantastic, although anachronistic.

At a Tudor feast it probably would have been served on its own, or perhaps it was a sweet snack with wine. See this site for more the wholebook.

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About Cooking with Clio

I am a historian. I teach at a large Southern California University. I love to cook and garden and I have recently taken up sewing.
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