Monthly Archives: October 2012

Spruce Beer Revisited

After checking my records it appears that Spruce Beer was in a different manuscript than I remembered. Instead of a late 18th century book it is in an early 19th century book kept by a woman living near Bristol who … Continue reading

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Parsnip Cake

I was all ready to post on an old recipe I found for Parsnip Cake thinking that it was an amazingly obscure type of cake. Then, of course, I did some further research on the web and discovered that Parsnip … Continue reading

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The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home

I have started reading Ken Albala and Rosanna Nafzinger Henderson’s The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home: The Happy Luddite’s Guide to Domestic Self-Sufficiency, and thus far, I love it. As the subtitle suggests, this second volume from these authors … Continue reading

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Spruce beer

This afternoon in class one of my students brought up Spruce beer, a classic, and according to some historians, an example of an American beer. While Virginia planters were no doubt brewing it in the eighteenth century and Amelia Simmons … Continue reading

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Amelia Simmons and American Cookery

In a couple of days I will be teaching parts of Amelia Simmons’s American Cookery. I usually use a section on roasting because it nicely illustrates the ways in which early American cooking drew upon English styles and approaches while using … Continue reading

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Meat Loaf for Tea

Another curious discovery from Martha Washington’s Rules for Cooking: meatloaf for tea. The recipe is titled “Beef Loaf.” It has only four ingredients: finely chopped lean steak, eggs, salt, and powdered crackers. This is formed into a loaf, dotted with … Continue reading

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Today’s discovery

I have been working my way through a cookbook put together by members of the Daughters of the American Revolution for the Bicentennial of George Washington’s birth. I found a recipe for liver and bacon as prepared for Aaron Burr … Continue reading

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Greetings!

I started this blog to get into the habit of writing every day. I hope to be able to post primarily on food history as I work on a long project. I will also include occasional posts about cooking, gardening … Continue reading

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